Science


About the Faculty

The Science Faculty deliver a variety of courses at all Key Stages, developing knowledge and skills in biology, chemistry, physics and general science.  The faculty has dedicated teaching staff, well equipped laboratories and are committed to delivering excellent learning for all students.

Science Assessment Plan KS3 2016-2017

 

To find out what is delivered at each Key Stage, please click the title below:

Years 7 to 9 – Key Stage 3

The Key Stage 3 Science course at Belper School aims to develop within students a deeper understanding of a range of scientific ideas in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students should begin to see the connections between these subject areas and become aware of some of the big ideas underpinning scientific knowledge and understanding e.g. the links between:

* structure and function in living organisms
* the particulate model, properties and interactions of matter
* energy resources and transfer of energy

Students will relate scientific explanations to phenomena in the world around them and start to use modelling and abstract ideas to develop and evaluate explanations.

SCI_KS3_1

In Year 7 students study the following five topics:

Introduction to Science, Matter and its Reactions, Forces and their Effect, How we are made, Energy and Electricity.

In Year 8 students study the following five topics:

Ecology and Classification, Elements, Compounds and Mixtures, Energy Transfers, Staying Alive, The Earth.

Year 9 consists of two parts:

In the Autumn term of Year 9, students study three topics: Forensic Science, The Need for Speed and Particles and Reactions, followed by an end of unit assessment.  This completes their Key Stage 3 Science course.

In the Spring and Summer terms, Year 9 students will start their Key Stage 4 course and will study Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics from Edexcel GCSE Combined Science.

(See Key Stage 4 Combined Science information for more specific detail)

The topic areas covered during the Key Stage 3 science course (Year 7, Year 8 and the first part of Year 9) are listed below:

BIOLOGY TOPICS CHEMISTRY TOPICS PHYSICS TOPICS
Cell Structures States of Matter Hooke’s Law
Enzymes Change of State Kinetic Theory
Transport in Plants Atomic Theory Motion
Health and Disease Periodic Table Introduction Current Electricity
  Metals Static Electricity
  Acids Fields

 

SCI_KS3_2

All classes are taught in mixed ability tutor groups in Year 7 and Year 8. Students are taught in sets in Year 9 for the remainder of the Key Stage 3 course and their GCSE studies.

Working Scientifically

Students will develop important scientific skills whilst covering the core content of science through the Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics. These skills include:

* use of models
* planning and carrying out investigations
* collecting, recording and processing data and evidence
* analysing and evaluating data and evidence
* developing scientific literacy and scientific attitudes

Through their Science work students will also develop skills in literacy, numeracy, ICT.

SCI_KS3_3

Assessment at Key Stage 3

Further details of Belper School’s Assessment Policy and the Science Faculty Assessment Policy can be found in the relevant section of the website.

Students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in Biology, Chemistry and Physics are assessed through a range of assessment opportunities. Assessment at Key Stage 3 is both formative and summative.  Formative, on-going assessment tasks e.g KATs determine what students have learned within a topic/module and students and teachers identify the ‘next steps’ for students to further develop and improve learning. Summative assessment tasks e.g topic tests and end of year exams measure the attainment of students within a topic or a range of topics.  Student progress can be determined using the results from formative and summative assessments.

Year 7 – Assessment Without Levels

*Each topic starts with a baseline task to identify prior knowledge and finishes with a formative assessment (self-assessed by students) so students can see the progress they have made and identify their next steps.

*End of topic assessments which allow students to demonstrate their scientific skills e.g. their ability to plan experiments and to carry out chemical reactions.
* Termly tests in the spring and summer terms

* Peer-assessed and self-assessed activities
* Homework activities

Year 8 and Year 9 – Assessed With Levels

*Each topic starts with a baseline task to identify prior knowledge and finishes with a formative assessment which is self-assessed by students so they can see the progress they have made and identify their next steps.

*End of topic assessments which allow students to demonstrate their scientific skills e.g. their ability to use models to explain scientific ideas.
* Termly tests in the spring and summer terms

* Peer-assessed and self-assessed activities
* Homework activities

Homework

Students are usually set weekly homework tasks, often from homework booklets, in accordance with the Belper School Science Faculty which is in line with the whole school policy. These may include short and long answer questions, extended writing, research, presentations, projects (over a longer period), making models, revision.

To support learning, students can access KS3 Science resources on ‘Weblearn’ and BBC Bite Size and there is a wealth of other science information on the internet for example the BBC Bite Size Science site which can be accessed at http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects/zng4d2p

Teachers may recommend specific websites when homework is set.

SCI_KS3_4

Extracurricular Activities

A variety of enrichment activities take place throughout the year, both in school and out of school. Activities which have taken place in previous years have included the Salters Chemistry Festival which takes place at a local University in May, Tomorrow’s Engineers Workshops and the bronze CREST award.

 

Years 10 to 11 – Key Stage 4

GCSE Science from 2016 (including Combined Science and Separate Sciences)

It remains a national priority that all students should have a good grasp of Science, so that they can make sense of the increasingly scientific and technological world we live in. All students will therefore have a common grounding and experience of Science, preparing them for the applications of Science that we all experience in our lives.

At Belper School, Science GCSE courses start in January of Year 9 and they continue throughout Years 10 and 11.  Students follow a specific pathway, as outlined below and complete all of the Biology, Chemistry and Physics units in core lesson time for Combined Science and if following Separate Sciences they also have their Option lessons.

Year 10 students will continue to study the new GCSE Combined Science or Separate Sciences Biology, Chemistry, Physics they started in January 2016 which will be externally assessed through examinations in May to June 2018.

science_1

There are two main ways to study Science at GCSE. These are Combined Science and Separate Sciences.

COMBINED SCIENCE (2 GCSEs in Science)

Combined Science covers Biology, Chemistry and Physics and results in 2 GCSEs.

Topics covered in Combined Science are externally assessed by two examinations at the end of Y11, each paper being 1hr 10mins in length and out of 60 marks. The marks from all 6 exams are totalled and an overall grade given. The topic areas covered by the papers are shown below:

Biology Paper 1  Topic 1 – Key concepts in biology, Topic 2 – Cells and control, Topic 3 – Genetics, Topic 4– Natural selection and genetic modification, Topic 5 – Health, disease and the development of medicines.

Biology Paper 2 Topic 1 – Key concepts in biology, Topic 6 – Plant structures and their functions, Topic 7 –Animal coordination, control and homeostasis, Topic 8 – Exchange and transport in animals, Topic 9 – Ecosystems and material cycles.

Chemistry Paper 1 Topic 1 – Key concepts in chemistry, Topic 2 – States of matter and mixtures, Topic 3 – Chemical changes, Topic 4 – Extracting metals and equilibria.

Chemistry Paper 2 Topic 1 – Key concepts in chemistry, Topic 6 – Groups in the periodic table, Topic 7 –Rates of reaction and energy changes, Topic 8 – Fuels and Earth science.

Physics Paper 1 Topic 1 – Key concepts of physics, Topic 2 – Motion and forces, Topic 3 – Conservation of energy, Topic 4 – Waves, Topic 5 – Light and the electromagnetic spectrum, Topic 6 – Radioactivity.

Physics Paper 2 Topic 1 – Key concepts of physics, Topic 8 – Energy – Forces doing work, Topic 9 – Forces and their effects, Topic 10 – Electricity and circuits, Topic 12 – Magnetism and the motor effect, Topic 13 – Electromagnetic induction, Topic 14 – Particle model, Topic 15 – Forces and matter.

There is no separately assessed coursework but students are expected to gain a good knowledge of the process of ‘Working Scientifically’ through a number of “core practicals” that will be assessed as part of the examinations along with mathematical skills.

These are a key part of the course with 6 in Biology, 5 in Chemistry and 7 in Physics, specified by Edexcel. Over the two years students will be given the opportunity to complete these practicals and make detailed notes on them for future revision.

There is also an increased emphasis on mathematical skills in the new courses. There are different weightings for maths within the exams, Combined Science 20% overall. Biology 10%, Chemistry 20% and Physics 30%.The main difference being that for the Physics exams students are expected to learn and be able to recall 19 key equations. They will have to know these to be able to answer up to 20% of the questions in the exam paper.

science_2

SEPARATE SCIENCES (3 GCSEs, Biology, Chemistry and Physics)

If Separate Sciences has been chosen as an option students will study the content of the Combined Science course as well as further or extended topics in the three Science subjects.

Topics covered in Separate Sciences are externally assessed by two examinations at the end of Y11, each paper being 1hr 45mins in length and out of 100 marks. The topic areas covered by the papers are shown below:

Biology Paper 1  Topic 1 – Key concepts in biology, Topic 2 – Cells and control, Topic 3 – Genetics,  Topic 4 – Natural selection and genetic modification, Topic 5 – Health, disease and the development of medicines.

Biology Paper 2  Topic 1 – Key concepts in biology, Topic 6 – Plant structures and their functions,  Topic 7 – Animal coordination, control and homeostasis,  Topic 8 – Exchange and transport in animals,  Topic 9 – Ecosystems and material cycles.

Chemistry Paper 1 Topic 1 – Key concepts in chemistry, Topic 2 – States of matter and mixtures, Topic 3 – Chemical changes, Topic 4 – Extracting metals and equilibria, Topic 5 – Separate chemistry 1.

Chemistry Paper 2 Topic 1 – Key concepts in chemistry,  Topic 6 – Groups in the periodic table,  Topic 7 – Rates of reaction and energy changes,  Topic 8 – Fuels and Earth science, Topic 9 – Separate chemistry 2.

Physics Paper 1 Topic 1 – Key concepts of physics, Topic 2 – Motion and forces, Topic 3 – Conservation of energy,  Topic 4 – Waves,  Topic 5 – Light and the electromagnetic spectrum,  Topic 6 – Radioactivity,  Topic 7 – Astronomy.

Physics Paper 2 Topic 1 – Key concepts of physics,  Topic 8 – Energy – Forces doing work,  Topic 9 – Forces and their effects,  Topic 10 – Electricity and circuits,  Topic 11 – Static electricity,  Topic 12 – Magnetism and the motor effect,  Topic 13 – Electromagnetic induction,  Topic 14 – Particle model,  Topic 15 – Forces and matter.

There is no separately assessed coursework but students are expected to gain a good knowledge of the process of ‘Working Scientifically’ through a number of “core practicals” that will be assessed as part of the examinations along with mathematical skills.

These are a key part of the course with 8 per subject specified by Edexcel. Over the two years students will be given the opportunity to complete these practicals and make detailed notes on them for future revision.

There is also an increased emphasis on mathematical skills in the new courses. There are different weightings for maths within the exams, Biology 10%, Chemistry 20% and Physics 30%. The main difference being that for the Physics exams students are expected to learn and be able to recall 19 key equations. They will have to know these equations to be able to answer up to 20% of the questions in the exam paper.

Specification Codes

Examination Board: Edexcel

Combined Science     1SC0

Biology                         1BI0

Chemistry                    1CH0

Physics                         1PH0

 

 

Years 12 to 13 – Sixth Form

Please click one of the subjects below for more information.

A Level Biology
A Level Chemistry
A Level Physics

 

A Level Biology

 

Examination Board: OCR

“This course has been challenging, very interesting and hard work. I have enjoyed it and feel proud to have achieved such good grades in the assessments and mock exams so far”
– A Year 12 Biology student

Within modules students will study a wide range of biological concepts that build directly upon GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science or GCSE Biology work. A student may have studied GCSE Further Additional Science but it is not a requirement. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Biology.

Throughout the course students will develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Biology. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 2 – 4 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Biology course not the AS Level Biology course. Over two years students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Biology.

Students will study the first four modules if they follow the AS Level Biology course

Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Biology                                                            
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level)
Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Biology (AS and A Level)                                                                           
Cell structure; Biological molecules; Nucleotides and nucleic acids; Enzymes; Biological membranes; Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation

Module 3 – Exchange and Transport (AS and A Level)                                                            
Exchange surfaces; Transport in animals; Transport in plants

Module 4 – Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease (AS and A Level)                                      
Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system; Biodiversity; Classification and evolution

AS Assessment – two AS Biology examinations in May/June

(01) Breadth in Biology – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written paper (70 marks)

(02) Depth in Biology – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

Please note: these ‘stand-alone’ examinations do not count towards the full A Level Biology Award.

 

YEAR 12/13 COURSE – New A Level Biology A (H432) – from June 2017

Examination Board: OCR  (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

 “Biology is the study of life itself; what life on planet Earth has been, what it is now and what it could be under our ever increasing influence”. – A Year 13 Biology student

Within modules students will continue to study a wide range of biological concepts that build directly on the AS Chemistry work. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Biology.

Throughout the course students will continue to develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Biology. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 2 – 6 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Biology course. Students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Biology.

Students will have studied Modules 1-4 of A Level Biology in their AS Biology course. Students will continue to study Modules 5 and 6 from June 2017 to May 2018 to complete the full A level Biology course.  Modules 1-6 will be revised for the examinations in 2018

Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Biology                                                               
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level)
Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Biology (AS and A Level)    
Cell structure; Biological molecules; Nucleotides and nucleic acids; Enzymes; Biological membranes; Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation

Module 3 – Exchange and Transport (AS and A Level)                                                            
Exchange surfaces; Transport in animals; Transport in plants

Module 4 – Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease (AS and A Level)                                      
Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system; Biodiversity;Classification and evolution

Module 5 – Communication, Homeostasis and Energy (A Level only)                            
Communication and homeostasis; Excretion as an example of homeostatic control; Neuronal communication; Hormonal communication; Plant and animal responses; Photosynthesis; Respiration

Module 6 – Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems (A Level only)                                                    
Cellular control; Patterns of inheritance; Manipulating genomes; Cloning and biotechnology Ecosystems; Populations and sustainability.

A Level Assessment – three A Level Biology examinations in May/June 2018

(01) Biological Processes – 37% of total A level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 5                                                                              
2 hours 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(02) Biological Diversity – 37% of total A level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 4 and 6
2 hours 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(03) Unified Biology – 26% of total A level                                                                               
Assessing content from modules 1- 6

1 h 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

(04) Practical Endorsement in Biology – reported separately non exam assessment

The assessment of practical skills is a compulsory requirement of the course of study for A level Biology. It will appear on all students’ certificates as a separately reported result, alongside the overall grade for the qualification. A minimum of 12 practical activities – PAGs will be carried out by each student. Teachers will assess students against OCR’s Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) to ensure they have achieved the required level of practical competence defined within these criteria. The 12 Practical Activity Groups (PAGs) are:

  1. Microscopy
  2. Dissection
  3. Sampling techniques
  4. Rates of enzyme controlled reactions
  5. Colorimeter or potometer
  6. Chromatography OR electrophoresis
  7. Microbiological techniques
  8. Transport in and out of cells
  9. Qualitative testing
  10. Investigation using a data logger OR computer modelling
  11. Investigation into the measurement of plant or animal responses
  12. Research skills

OTHER INFORMATION

  • Students will develop relevant mathematical, literacy, ‘How Science works’ skills and throughout the A Level course(s) and they will improve revision and examination skills.
  • Students may take part in extra-curricular activities to support and extend the work covered in parts of the A Level course.
  • Students will be given advice about qualification requirements for further or higher education courses or apprenticeship opportunities that they may be considering.

By the end of the course students will have had the opportunity to lay a solid foundation to build upon through further study or training at College, University or in employment.

If students are interested in:

  • The human body
  • The secret life of plants
  • Cutting edge developments
  • Current research
  • Environmental issues and building ethical arguments

Leading to a career in:

  • Health and medical related occupations
  • Animal related occupations
  • Environmental work
  • Forensics
  • Conservation
  • Biology
  • Microbiology
  • Agriculture
  • Genetic Engineering
  • and many, many more …

  

YEAR 12/13 – New A Level Biology A (H420) 

Examination Board: OCR  (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

“Biology is the study of life itself; what life on planet Earth has been, what it is now and what it could be under our ever increasing influence”. – A Year 13 Biology student

Within modules students will study a wide range of biological concepts that build directly upon AS Biology work. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Biology.

Throughout the course students will continue to develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Biology. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 2 – 6 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Biology course not the AS Level Biology course. Over two years students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Biology.

Students will study the first four modules if they follow the AS Level Biology course

Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Biology
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level)
Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Biology (AS and A Level)                                                                           
Cell structure; Biological molecules; Nucleotides and nucleic acids; Enzymes; Biological membranes; Cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation

Module 3 – Exchange and Transport (AS and A Level)                                                            
Exchange surfaces; Transport in animals; Transport in plants

Module 4 – Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease (AS and A Level)                                      
Communicable diseases, disease prevention and the immune system; Biodiversity;Classification and evolution

AS Assessment – two AS Biology examinations

(01) Breadth in Biology – 50% of total AS level 
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written paper (70 marks)

(02) Depth in Biology – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4

1 hour 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

Please note: these ‘stand-alone’ examinations do not count towards the full A Level Biology Award.

 

A Level Chemistry

 

Examination Board: OCR   (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

‘Chemistry lies at the heart of everything. It is the study of the structure, properties and synthesis of matter. Nothing exists without Chemistry!’ – A Year 12 Chemistry student

Within modules students will study a wide range of chemical concepts that build directly on GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science or GCSE Chemistry work. A student may have studied GCSE Further Additional Science but it is not a requirement. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Chemistry.

Throughout the course students will develop a range of practical skills as detailed in                          Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 1 – 4 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Chemistry course not the AS Level Chemistry course. Over two years students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Chemistry.

Students will study the first four modules if they follow the AS Level Chemistry A course
Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level) Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Chemistry (AS and A Level)
Atoms, compounds, molecules and equations; Amount of substance; Acid–base and redox reactions; Electrons, bonding and structure

Module 3 – Periodic Table and Energy (AS and A Level)
The periodic table and periodicity; Group 2 and the halogens; Qualitative analysis; Enthalpy changes; Reaction rates and equilibrium (qualitative)

Module 4 – Core Organic Chemistry (AS and A Level)
Basic concepts; Hydrocarbons; Alcohols and haloalkanes; Organic synthesis; Analytical techniques (IR and MS)

AS Assessment – two AS Chemistry examinations

 (01) Breadth in Chemistry – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written paper (70 marks)

(02) Depth in Chemistry – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

Please note: these ‘stand-alone’ examinations do not count towards the full A Level Chemistry Award.

YEAR 12/13 COURSE – New A Level Chemistry A (H432) – from June 2017 – May 2018

Examination Board: OCR  (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

“Chemistry is so interesting …. like a language of its own. Its beauty…. it means something you couldn’t say in English. It’s happening all around us all of the time without us realising”.
– A Year 13 Chemistry student

Within modules students will continue to study a wide range of chemical concepts that build directly on the AS Chemistry work. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Chemistry.

Throughout the course students will continue to develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 1 – 6 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Chemistry course.               Students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Chemistry.

Students will have studied Modules 1 -4 of A Level Chemistry in their AS Chemistry course. Students will continue to study Modules 5 and 6 from June 2017 to May 2018 to complete the full A level Chemistry course.  Modules 1 -6 will be revised for the examinations in 2018.

Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level) Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Chemistry (AS and A Level)
Atoms, compounds, molecules and equations; Amount of substance; Acid–base and redox reactions; Electrons, bonding and structure

Module 3 – Periodic Table and Energy (AS and A Level)
The periodic table and periodicity; Group 2 and the halogens; Qualitative analysis; Enthalpy changes; Reaction rates and equilibrium (qualitative)

Module 4 – Core Organic Chemistry (AS and A Level)
Basic concepts; Hydrocarbons; Alcohols and haloalkanes; Organic synthesis; Analytical techniques (IR and MS)

Module 5 – Physical Chemistry and Transition Elements (A Level only)
Reaction rates and equilibrium (quantitative); pH and buffers; Enthalpy, entropy and free energy; Redox and electrode potentials; Transition elements

Module 6 – Organic Chemistry and Analysis (A Level only)
Aromatic compounds; Carbonyl compounds; Carboxylic acids and esters; Nitrogen compounds; Polymers; Organic synthesis; Chromatography & spectroscopy (NMR)

A Level Assessment – three A Level Chemistry examinations in May/June 2018

(01) Periodic Table, Elements and Physical Chemistry – 37% of total A level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 5
2 hour 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(02) Synthesis and Analytical techniques – 37% of total A level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 4 and 6
2 hour 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(03) Unified Chemistry – 26% of total A level
Assessing content from modules 1- 6
1 hour 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

(04) Practical Endorsement in Chemistry – reported separately non exam assessment 

The assessment of practical skills is a compulsory requirement of the course of study for A Level Chemistry. It will appear on all students’ certificates as a separately reported result, alongside the overall grade for the qualification. A minimum of 12 practical activities – PAGs will be carried out by each student. Teachers will assess students against OCR’s Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) to ensure they have achieved the required level of practical competence defined within these criteria. The 12 Practical Activity Groups (PAGs) are:

  1. Moles determination
  2. Acid–base titration
  3. Enthalpy determination
  4. Qualitative analysis of ions
  5. Synthesis of an organic liquid
  6. Synthesis of an organic solid
  7. Qualitative analysis of organic functional groups
  8. Electrochemical cells
  9. Rates of reaction – continuous monitoring method
  10. Rates of reaction – initial rates method
  11. pH measurement
  12. Research skills

OTHER INFORMATION

  • Students will develop relevant mathematical, literacy, ‘How Science works’ skills throughout the A Level course(s) and they will improve revision and examination skills.
  • Students may take part in extra-curricular activities to support and extend the work covered in parts of the A Level course e.g. a spectroscopy course at a local University.
  • Students will be given advice about qualification requirements for further or higher education courses or apprenticeship opportunities that they may be considering.

A Level Chemistry provides a firm foundation for students to progress to study Chemistry at
further or higher education or to follow courses in related subjects e.g. medicine, biochemistry, veterinary science, forensic science, engineering, dentistry, physiotherapy, sports science, oceanography, environmental sciences.

If students are interested in:
• Practical Chemistry
• Chemical Applications
• Patterns & Trends in Data
• Problem Solving
• Chemical Research
• Cutting Edge Science

Leading to a career in:
• Chemistry
• Engineering
• Biochemistry
• Biosciences
• Medical occupations
• Veterinary Sciences
• Geosciences
• Pharmacy
• Dentistry
• Law
• and many, many more …

 

 

 

A Level Physics

 

Examination Board: OCR   (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

“Physics is a subject that asks the fundamental questions about how the world works.  How do matter and forces interact in all situations. – A Year 12 Physics student

Within modules students will study a wide range of physical concepts that build directly on GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science or GCSE Physics work. A student may have studied GCSE Further Additional Science but it is not a requirement. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Physics.

Throughout the course students will develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Physics. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 2 – 4 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Physics course not the AS Level Physics course. Over two years students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Physics.

Students will study the first four modules if they follow the AS Level Physics A course
Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in Physics
Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level) Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Physics (AS and A Level)

Physical quantities and units; Making measurements and analysing data; Nature of quantities

Module 3 – Forces and motion (AS and A Level)

Motion; Forces in action; Work, energy and power; Materials; Newton’s laws of motion and momentum

Module 4 – Electrons, Waves and Photons (AS and A Level)

Charge and Current; Energy, Power and Resistance; Electrical Circuits, Waves, Quantum Physics

AS Assessment – two AS Physics examinations

 (01) Breadth in Physics – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written paper (70 marks)

(02) Depth in Physics – 50% of total AS level
Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 4
1 hour 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

Please note: these ‘stand-alone’ examinations do not count towards the full A Level Physics Award.

 

YEAR 12/13 COURSE – New A Level Physics A (H432) – from June 2017 – May 2018

Examination Board: OCR  (www.ocr.org.uk – for further details)

“I chose Physics because I was intrigued at the mechanisms in life. I also enjoy working through the mathematical principles behind it.”– A Year 13 Physics student

Within modules students will continue to study a wide range of chemical concepts that build directly on the AS Physics work. Each module is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Physics.

Throughout the course students will continue to develop a range of practical skills as detailed in Module 1Development of Practical Skills in Physics. These skills are integrated within the topics of Modules 2 – 6 and they are assessed through written examinations. The internally assessed ‘Practical Endorsement’ skills form part of the full A Level Physics course. Students will complete a minimum of 12 assessed experiments covering technical skills together with the use of apparatus and practical techniques. Students will also gain an awareness of the environmental, technological, ethical and economic aspects of Physics.

Students will have studied Modules 1-4 of A Level Physics in their AS Physics course. Students will continue to study Modules 5 and 6 from June 2017 to May 2018 to complete the full A level Physics course.  Modules 1-6 will be revised for the examinations in 2018.

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in Physics

Practical skills assessed in the written examinations (AS and A Level)

Practical Endorsement skills (A Level only)

Module 2 – Foundations in Physics (AS and A Level)

Physical quantities and units; Making measurements and analysing data; Nature of quantities

Module 3 – Forces and motion (AS and A Level)

Motion; Forces in action; Work, energy and power; Materials; Newton’s laws of motion and momentum

Module 4 – Electrons, Waves and Photons (AS and A Level)

Charge and Current; Energy, Power and Resistance; Electrical Circuits, Waves, Quantum Physics

Module 5 – Newtonian World and Astrophysics (A Level only)

Thermal Physics; Circular motion; Oscillations; Gravitational fields; Astrophysics and cosmology

Module 6 – Particles and medical physics (A Level only)

Capacitors; Electric fields; Electromagnetism; Nuclear and particle physics;

Medical imaging

A Level Assessment – three A Level Physics examinations in May/June 2018

(01) Modelling Physics – 37% of total A level

Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 5

2 h 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(02) Exploring Physics – 37% of total A level

Assessing content from modules 1, 2, 4 and 6

2 h 15 mins written examination paper (100 marks)

(03) Unified Physics – 26% of total A level

Assessing content from modules 1- 6

1 h 30 mins written examination paper (70 marks)

(04) Practical Endorsement in Physics – reported separately non exam assessment 

The assessment of practical skills is a compulsory requirement of the course of study for A Level Physics. It will appear on all students’ certificates as a separately reported result, alongside the overall grade for the qualification. A minimum of 12 practical activities – PAGs will be carried out by each student. Teachers will assess students against OCR’s Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) to ensure they have achieved the required level of practical competence defined within these criteria. The 12 Practical Activity Groups (PAGs) are:

  1.     Investigating motion
  2.     Investigating properties of materials
  3.     Investigating electrical properties
  4.     Investigating electrical circuits
  5.     Investigating waves
  6.     Investigating quantum effects
  7.     Investigating ionising radiation
  8.     Investigating gases
  9.     Investigating capacitors
  10.     Investigating simple harmonic motion
  11.     Investigation
  12.     Research skills

OTHER INFORMATION

  • Students will develop relevant mathematical, literacy, ‘How Science works’ skills throughout the A Level course(s) and they will improve revision and examination skills.
  • Students may take part in extra-curricular activities to support and extend the work covered in parts of the A Level course.
  • Students will be given advice about qualification requirements for further or higher education courses or apprenticeship opportunities that they may be considering.

A Level Physics provides a firm foundation for students to progress to study Physics at
further or higher education or to follow courses in related subjects e.g. astrophysics, biophysics, engineering, cosmology, ophthalmology, ocean and marine sciences

If students are interested in:

  • Strategic thinking
  • Solving problems
  • Science
  • Underlying patterns in the physical world

Leading to a career in:

  • Physics
  • Engineering
  • Biophysics
  • Medical occupations
  • Computing
  • Geophysics
  • Financial Services
  • Oceanography
  • Law
  • and many, many more …