Technology


About the Faculty

The Technology Faculty deliver a variety of courses at all Key Stages, developing knowledge and skills in electronics, graphic design, textiles, catering and resistant materials.  The faculty has dedicated teaching staff, well equipped workshops, good resources and are committed to delivering excellent learning for all students.

Technology Assessment And Marking Procedures
Technology Assessment Plan - Autumn Term 1
Technology Assessment Plan - Autumn Term 2

Keep up to date with current news from our department  @belpertech  (twitter)

Students can access workbooklets / homework / recipes from the Design & Technology page of the school’s weblearn site – WEBLEARN

To find out what is delivered at each Key Stage, please click the title below:

Years 7 to 9 – Key Stage 3

In Years 7, 8 & 9 students study a range of design and making disciplines: Product Design, Food, Graphics, Electronics, and Textiles.

Students learn by carrying out a range of exciting and engaging projects and assignments in classes of mixed ability.

Projects are delivered by an expert member of staff in specialist rooms / workshops which are equipped with up to date machines and equipment.

Usually one or more products are designed, made and then taken home in each discipline.

As well as providing opportunity for knowledge and values to be delivered and essential practical skills to be developed, each project provides scope for students to apply individual creative flair.

To support teaching and learning, projects are delivered using specially produced booklets. These provide key information about the topic, space for students to complete school based tasks as well as details of homework set. There are usually two or three pieces of homework in each project which should take between 20 and 30 minutes to complete. Parents and carers are encouraged to support their child in the completion of homework tasks. The booklets give clear guidance about what is expected, as well as space for assessment and feedback on how progress can be made.

Whilst acknowledging the important place of traditional skills and methods, the Design and Technology Faculty is keen to provide students with up to date, commercially relevant experiences and access to the latest technology. Computers, a range of software and computer controlled machines are used extensively throughout Key Stage Three.

Core skills are assessed throughout KS3; these include designing, making, testing and evaluating, technical understanding, and Food & Nutrition.

For up to date information on activities in the department follow us on twitter @BelperTech

The Design and Technology Faculty offers a wide range of extra-curricular clubs and activities. The nature of these change quite frequently as new technology and equipment become available. In the past, clubs have made a fully-working hovercraft and camera carrying rockets. Current clubs include: 3D Printing, Fashion and Food master-classes, CNC Router Making. Students are always represented at the Young Engineers and Scientists of Derbyshire Competition and various other competitions are entered on a regular basis with considerable success.

 

Tech 1

 

Year 7

 

Product Design & Electronics

Adjustable LED Lamp

This project provides an introduction to safe workshop practice, hand-tools, machines, equipment and components. Students will also use soldering irons and will learn about thermoforming plastics using the plug & yoke process and vacuum-former. Students develop their design skills and learn how to turn 2D sketches into 3D images and begin to learn Computer Aided Design.

Food (Cooking & Nutrition)

Students will be taught the following practical skills – knife skills, safe use of the cooker, reduction and all-in-one sauce, rubbing in method, rolling and shaping dough.

Y7 Recipe Book

Students will also learn about seasonality, current healthy eating guidelines, how to use a nutritional analysis programme, and how to modify recipes.

 

All students have the opportunity to complete the Sainsbury’s Star Chef Bronze Award and can take part in our annual Healthy Eating Week activities.

Videos of practical skills food a fact of life 

Further information on Seasonality www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips

 

Textiles

Students will learn a variety of skills including tie-dying, applique, stencilling, printing, threading and using a sewing machine, 2D design. They will create and make their own shopping or PE bag incorporating all these skills.

 

Learn more about electronics here www.bbc.co.uk/education/subjects

Learn about different types of plastic here www.bbc.co.uk/education and www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips

Learn more about wood here bbc.co.uk/wood

Learn more about metals here bbc.co.uk/metal

Enjoy designing? – crackingideas.com/stuff-to-do

Extension tasks – lamp design www.bbc.co.uk/education/clip

 

Year 8

 

Design and Technology in Year 8 builds upon the skills learned in Year 7 and also aims to give students the opportunity to learn creatively through experimentation in order to develop problem solving techniques.

Graphic Design -Corporate ID

Students are introduced to a wide range of techniques employed by Graphic Designers. Digital skills include the use of Photoshop and other Computer Aided Design software to produce graphic design images and outcomes. Students also learn about and practise traditional hand drawing techniques; one and two point perspective, isometric drawing and rendering. Students will apply these skills and develop a final product that employs our sublimation printing technology to transfer images to different objects – in Year 8 students produce a mug with a 2D or 3D image printed on it.

                   

 

Structures

The different kinds of structures – Natural and Man-made as well as the main categories of Shell and Frame are the focus of this topic.  Students develop designs and models of bridge structures using both specialist software and physical models. Testing to destruction is a fun way for students to learn how to make structures strong and stable.

 

Crumble (not the fruit kind)

Year 8 also sees students begin learning knowledge and skills needed to control machines using computer software. We employ ‘Crumble’ devises that allow students to programme autonomous robots to complete a range of tasks including following a route and carrying out a series of set routines.

                      

Bling

Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM) are explored in this project that sees students use 2D CAD software to design a mould. The design is sent to the Laser cutter which manufactures the mould from thin sheets of MDF. Students then melt and cast pewter into the mould. Hand-finishing skills required to complete an effective key ring or piece of jewellery are then employed.

Learn more about casting here – Casting

Learn more about silversmithing here – Silversmithing

 

Food (Cooking & Nutrition)

During Year 8 the following practical skills will be covered: creaming method, bread making, cooking meat safely and cooking foods from different cultures. Hygiene, bacteria and food poisoning are covered in depth during this project.

More information on foreign foods and culture here – www.bbc.co.uk/education/clips

Greek restaurant www.bbc.co.uk/education/clip

All Year 8 students have the opportunity to attain the Sainsbury’s Star Chef Silver Award.

The Derby “Love Food Hate Waste” team visited our KS3 students to teach about sustainability, and students made pizzas with ingredients which often get wasted unnecessarily.

 

Textiles

Students develop their creative design skills in this project, learning how to design their own Pop Art inspired fabric which is digitally printed. This is then incorporated into a lined, zipped pencil case.

 

Year 9

Product Design and Electronics

In Year 9, projects provide a strong foundation for GCSE study as well as encourage students to develop individual / creative responses to design challenges.

Mechanisms Project

A series of experiment based topics designed to develop problem-solving techniques includes; the theory and practical deployment of motion, levers and mechanisms. Students complete a range of challenges that include developing the most efficient shape and size of wind-turbine blades which are tested to see how much electricity can be generated.

                

6R’s Project

In this assignment, students learn about the need for sustainable design and the impact of design and manufacture on our environment. Items that would previously be thrown-away are closely examined for the potential to be re-used, recycled or re-purposed. Students then employ the range of skills and knowledge learned since Year 7 to produce a functional outcome of their own design.

             

3D Printing Project

Students also get to grips with the new technology involved in 3D printing. Video tutorials allow students to develop the software skills needed to design in 3D – outcomes are then printed on one of our 3D printers.

          


 Intelligent Design

As more of the products around us become connected and intelligent, Students in Year 9 learn about Programmable Interface Controllers, how to write and download programmes to micro-chips that then form part of a functioning product manufactured using CAD/CAM.

              

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food (Cooking & Nutrition)

Students will learn the following practical skills – melting method, whisking method, coating and cooking meat/fish safely, use of gelatine as a setting agent, dovetailing tasks. The focus in theory lessons will be on nutritional needs throughout life, special dietary requirements, nutritional labelling, sustainability, traceability and environmental issues, and developing recipes for a specific need.

Y9 Recipe Book

Extension info – fats – what-is-fat-george-zaidan & the-chemistry-of-cookies-stephanie-warren

Nutritional analysis tool for homework task explorefood.foodafactoflife

All Year 9 students have the opportunity to attain the Sainsbury’s Star Chef Gold Award. 

Students may also want to compete in the Derbyshire Student Chef of the Year Competition (Photo shows Charley King – winner of main course 2016)

 

Textiles

Students will learn to develop their own 3D designs in fabric as they design and make a door stop. Inspiration can come from anywhere from pineapples to football teams!

Electronics

Identify, evaluate and use Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs), programmable Integrated Circuits (ICs) and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs).

Use and understand circuit wizard and genie IC programming.

Students will design and make a suitable casing sciencequiz.net/electronics

Students will also take part in Mechanisms challenges, and iterative design task linked to sustainability, and have the opportunity to try 3D printing (CAD/CAM)

 

 

Years 10 to 11 – Key Stage 4

The Design and Technology Faculty offers a wide range of GCSE courses at Key Stage 4 so that students can choose an area that they are most interested in. All options have creative Design and Making at the heart and have been chosen to allow students to gain a solid grounding in the various aspects of Design and Technology. This experience will provide an excellent starting point for further study, either at A Level, or through more vocational routes, such as Apprenticeships.

Students will develop and apply design skills that will help to prepare them for modern contexts in the world today. New and emerging technologies will be explored to support design expertise now and in the future. Innovation and creativity is encouraged, adding the confidence to take design risks. Numerous transferable skills essential for further study at a higher level and the workplace will be developed.

The areas of specialism relate to:

Electronics

This specification encourages the investigation and study of electronics in a variety of contexts – home, school, recreation, community, business and industry. Candidates from all cultures and both genders can develop their interest in, enjoyment of, and critical reflection about electronics as an integral part of modern society. Candidates have the opportunity to analyse and evaluate situations, design and make electronic products and then appraise their performance. They will be provided with the opportunity to work with a range of components. Candidates are encouraged to consider the relationship between electronics and society.

Unit 1: Discovering Electronics (35%) Written Paper: 1 hour 60 marks (70 UMS) – Assessment is by on-screen e-assessment.

Unit 2: Applications of Electronics (40%) Written Paper: 1 hour 60 marks (80 UMS) – Assessment is by on-screen e-assessment.

Unit 3: Electronics System Design & Realisation (25%) Controlled Assessment 60 marks (50 UMS) – Candidates/teachers devise a design task. They realise and write a report on the development of the task. The assessment is undertaken entirely under the supervision of the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graphic Design

This course is designed to give insight in to real world experiences of practicing Graphic Designers. Where possible an emphasis is placed on the production of practical ‘made’ outcomes which are used as a method of teaching and learning.

Assessment is designed to reward students’ capability across a wide range of activities.

  • A Design and Make Project folder and practical outcome that is worth 50% of qualification. There are four parts to the assessment: Part 1: Investigate. Part 2: Design. Part 3: Make. Part 4: Evaluate.
  • A single written exam of 1 hour and 45 minutes which is worth 50% of qualification.

Students will work on a project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

Students are given a choice of three contextual challenges, from which they choose one.

From the contextual challenge, students identify a problem and a design context then develop a range of potential solutions and realise one.

Encourages creativity and imagination.

Real world problems, with associated needs, wants and values of the end user.

Students should take ownership.

The portfolio will contain approximately 20 to 30 sides of A3 paper (or electronic equivalent).

 

         

 

Food Preparation and Nutrition

GCSE Food Preparation & Nutrition allows students to –

  • demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment
  • develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks
  • understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
  • understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
  • understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes 50% of qualification

Non-examination assessment: internally assessed,  50% of qualification  (externally moderated)catering_1

Assessment 1: The Food Investigation Assessment  (Assessment 1: 8 hours)

A scientific food investigation which will assess the learner’s knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food.

Assessment 2: The Food Preparation Assessment (Assessment 2: 12 hours)

Prepare, cook and present a menu which assesses the learner’s knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking and presentation of food.

 

Product Design

This course is designed to give insight into real world experiences of practicing Product Designers. Where possible an emphasis is placed on the production of practical ‘made’ outcomes which are used as a method of teaching and learning.

Assessment is designed to reward students’ capability across a wide range of activities.

  • A single written exam of 1 hour and 45 minutes which is worth 50% of qualification.
  • A Design and Make Project folder and practical outcome that is worth 50% of qualification.

There are four parts to the assessment: Part 1: Investigate. Part 2: Design. Part 3: Make. Part 4: Evaluate.

Students will work on a project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

Students are given a choice of three contextual challenges, from which they choose one.

From the contextual challenge, students identify a problem and a design context then develop a range of potential solutions and realise one.

Encourages creativity and imagination.

Real world problems, with associated needs, wants and values of the end user.

Students should take ownership.

The portfolio will contain approximately 20 to 30 sides of A3 paper (or electronic equivalent).

 

 

Textiles

This course is designed to give insight into real world experiences of practicing Textile Designers. Where possible an emphasis is placed on the production of practical ‘made’ outcomes which are used as a method of teaching and learning.

Assessment is designed to reward students’ capability across a wide range of activities.

  • A single written exam of 1 hour and 45 minutes which is worth 50% of qualification.
  • A Design and Make Project folder and practical outcome that is worth 50% of qualification.

There are four parts to the assessment: Part 1: Investigate. Part 2: Design. Part 3: Make. Part 4: Evaluate.

Students will work on a project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

Students are given a choice of three contextual challenges, from which they choose one.

From the contextual challenge, students identify a problem and a design context then develop a range of potential solutions and realise one.

Encourages creativity and imagination.

Real world problems, with associated needs, wants and values of the end user.

Students should take ownership.

The portfolio will contain approximately 20 to 30 sides of A3 paper (or electronic equivalent).

textiles_1                     textiles_3                          textiles_2

 

Years 12 to 13 – Sixth Form

These creative and thought-provoking qualifications give students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers, especially those in the creative industries. Students will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing products of their choice. Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and apprenticeships

Please click one of the subjects below for more information.

Product Design – 3D Design
Product Design – Graphic Design
WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition

 

Product Design – 3D Design3D Design

Good design should be creative and sustainable. It is increasingly important within society and for our economy. Explore how creativity and understanding of Science and Technology can be used to generate sustainable solutions to problems experienced by all kinds of people in a range of different situations.

Design and make products that are fit for purpose, satisfy wants and needs, enhance our day to day lives and, most importantly, allow for a sustainable future.

 

 

 

Component 1.  Principles of Design and Technology.  50% of qualification. 100 marks

Topics 1-7 are common topics to both AS and A level.

1: Materials

2: Performance characteristics of materials

3: Processes and techniques

4: Digital technologies

5: Factors influencing the development of products

6: Effects of technological developments

7: Potential hazards and risk assessment.

Written examination. Exam 2hrs. 100 marks.

The paper includes calculations, short-open and open-response questions. as well as extended writing questions.

Component 2. 50% of qualification. Non-examined assessment. 100 marks

Independent Design and Make Project.

Students to undertake a small-scale design, make and evaluate project in response to a realistic contextual challenge set by Pearson, taking into account the needs and wants of the user. The project consists of a portfolio and a prototype. There are four parts to the assessment covering identification of opportunities for design, designing a prototype, making a prototype and evaluating own design and prototype.

The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.

A2 Course Description  (Two years)

Assessment Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology,  50% of qualification

Topics 1-12:

1: Materials

2: Performance characteristics of materials

3: Processes and techniques

4: Digital technologies

5: Factors influencing the development of products

6: Effects of technological developments

7: Potential hazards and risk assessment

8: Features of manufacturing industries

9: Designing for maintenance and the cleaner environment

10: Current legislation

11: Information handling, Modelling and forward planning

12: Further processes and techniques.

Written examination.   120 marks.  Exam 2hrs 30 mins.

The paper includes calculations, open-response questions and extended writing questions.

Assessment Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project. 50% of qualification

Students will produce a substantial design, make and evaluate project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype.

There are four parts to the assessment covering the identification of a design problem, developing the design, making the prototype and evaluating both the design and the final prototype.

Non-examined assessment. 120 marks

The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.

 

Product Design – Graphic Design

 

Graphic Design GCE is a popular choice for those who are interested in developing problem solving and creative design skills relevant to the commercial fields of Advertising, Branding and Information Design. An emphasis is placed on designing, communicating and modelling concepts using hand, machine and CAD/CAM techniques.

Advertising includes communicating information, arousing interest, brand recognition. Also, corporate identity, logo design, web-based and digital advertising and the use of social media. Photography, animation and video.

Illustration includes the development of visual outcomes designed to enhance understanding of text or other forms of communication. Encompassing a very wide range of media and equipment use and purpose.

Branding includes the development and construction of three-dimensional prototypes, considering sustainable or renewable materials. Also, the legal requirements for information that must be included on packaging, and for barcoding and tracking.

Information Design includes the requirements for digital and print-based products, such as magazine design, newspaper design, web page design, leaflet and poster design. Also, 3D digital graphic techniques, creating and applying textures and lighting effects.

Interface design, web-based, projection, touch-screen, mobile phones, DVD, downloadable content.

Students will be required to work in one or more of the disciplines to communicate their ideas. By working across disciplines, they will extend their understanding of the scope of graphic communication; by focusing on one discipline, they will gain a deeper understanding of specific processes within graphic communication.

For the purposes of this qualification, graphic communication is sub-divided into the following four disciplines:  advertising , illustration, branding &  information design.

Assessment component 1  : Personal Investigation

Paper codes: 8GC0/01

Internally set, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated. 50% of the total qualification.

This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing personal resolved outcome.

Assessment incorporates supporting studies and practical work and will comprise a portfolio of development work and outcomes based on themes and ideas developed from personal starting points.

Assessment component 2 : Externally Set Assignment

Paper codes: 8GC0/02,

Externally set, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated. 50% of the total qualification.

This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing personal resolved outcome(s) in response to an externally set theme.

Assessment incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 10–hour period of sustained focus used to produce a final outcome.

There are no written examinations for the AS or A2 in Visual Communication

The full range of design fields are considered including; promotional materials, architecture, vehicle design; interior design, garden design.

 

WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition

 

Candidates will develop skills and knowledge relating to:
• nutrition,
• food production,
• food safety,
• hygiene,
• social and environmental issues

The course is made up of four units:

Unit 1 – Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups
Unit 2 – Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat
Unit 3 – Experimenting to Solve Food Production
Unit 4 – Current Issues in Food, Science and Nutrition

All learners must take Units One and Two and then select either Unit Three or Unit Four.
Unit 1 will enable the learner to demonstrate an understanding of the science of food safety, nutrition and nutritional needs in a wide range of contexts, and through on–going practical sessions, to gain practical skills to produce quality food items to meet the needs of individuals.

Unit 2 allows learners to develop their understanding of the science of food safety and hygiene; essential knowledge for anyone involved in food production in the home or wishing to work in the food industry. Again practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience. Studying one of the two optional units allows learners the opportunity to study subjects of particular interest or relevance to them, building on previous learning and experiences.

Assessment includes an investigative study, analysis of a case study, and an external theory examination.